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Who Gives Statistics on Giving


Canada

While there is little research available on planned giving, organizations such as Statistics Canada, Canada Revenue Agency, and the Imagine Canada provide some insights on charitable trends in Canada. However, more research, is needed to assess the effectiveness of different types of gifts to charities and not-for-profit organizations.

Giving Facts:

  • Almost 23 million Canadians or 84% of the population aged 15 and over, made a financial donation to a charitable or non-profit organization during 2007.
  • During the same period, 12.5 million Canadians, or 46% of the population, volunteered their time through a group or organization. These rates were largely unchanged from a 2004 survey.
  • Canadians donated a total of $10 billion in 2007, up from $8.9 billion in 2004.
  • In 2007, the average donation was $437, compared with $400 in 2004. These increases were not adjusted for inflation.
  • The total amount of time volunteered through groups and organizations amounted to about 2.1 billion hours, which was equivalent to almost 1.1 million full-time jobs. On average, volunteers contributed 166 hours each.

Information obtained from: – Statistics Canada

  • The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) reports that within Canada there are 83,500 registered charitable organizations and 80,000 federal and provincial not-for profit organizations.
  • In sum, there are over 160,000 charities and not-for profit-organizations in Canada.
  • Corporations in Canada are the least likely to give. In 2003, 3% of corporations claimed charitable donations in Canada. These claims totalled $1 billion.
  • Statistics Canada reports that in 2006, 25% of Canadians who filed a tax return claimed a charitable donation. These claims totalled $8.5 billion.
  • In 2004, 22.4 million Canadians, approximately 84% of the population made a financial donation of some sort, however only 4% left a gift behind in their will.
  • Today, 7% of Canadians support charitable organizations by leaving a planned gift in their will.
  • In 2004 the top three types of organizations supported by Canadians were:
    • Religious Organizations (45%)
    • Health (14%)
    • Social Services (10%)
  • In 2004 the bottom three types of organizations supported by Canadians were:
    • Environmental (2%)
    • Sports and Recreation (2%)
    • Law, Advocacy and Politics (1%)

Although the statistics are few, it is evident that charities and not-for-profit organizations still rely heavily on individual contributions and support from Canadians. The support is concentrated in some areas more than others, this is why it is important to raise further awareness of the impact of giving. Many organizations, both large and small, are committed to making a positive change in the world and can benefit from your contribution! To search a charity in your area, click here.

For further research on planned giving in Canada, please visit our resource page.

Information obtained from: Statistics Canada’s Survey of Giving Volunteering and Participating, 2004 back to top, June 2008 Imagine Canada Newsletter, and CRA Giving to charity: Information for donors Speaker’s Kit


United States

There is little more research available on planned giving and giving trends within the United States, including recent findings from the Giving USA foundation providing some useful insights on recent charitable trends in the United States.

  • Charitable donations exceeded a record $300 billion in 2007. As a result, charitable giving increased 4% from 2006, or 1% when adjusted for inflation.
  • Giving USA reports that this record breaking year is a reflection of the strong inflation of the 2007 economy:
    • 2.3% growth in Gross Domestic Product
    • 2.5% growth in personal income
    • 1.3% growth in corporate profits
    • Stock market closed higher than 2006 close
  • In 2007 gifts from individuals made up the majority of donations at an estimated $229.03 billion (74.8% of the total)
  • Charitable bequests were 7.6% of total giving in 2007, an increase of 6.9% since 2006
  • Total giving in 2007 was made up of:
    • Individual donations – 74.8%
    • Foundations – 12.6%
    • Bequests – 7.6%
    • Corporations – 5.1%
  • In 2007 the top three types of organizations supported by Americans were:
    • Religious Congregations – 33.4% of total estimated giving
    • Education Organizations – 14.1%
    • Human Services – 9.7%
  • In 2007 the bottom three types of organizations supported by Americans were:
    • Arts/Culture/Humanities – 4.5% of total estimated giving
    • International Affairs (including relieft, direct aid, exchange, and other programs focossing on international issues) – 4.3%
    • Environmental/Animal Rights – 2.3%

The statistics are few, but it is clear that United States is the biggest giver in the world, breaking even its own records. However, it is noteworthy that charities and not-for-profit organizations still rely heavily on the individual contributions. This is why it is important to raise further awareness of the impact giving has on organizations.

Many organizations both large and small that are committed to making a positive change in the world and can benefit from your support! To search a charity in your area, click here.

For further research on planned giving in the U.S., please visit http://www.givingusa.org/

For more information on planned giving, please visit our resource page.

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International

For information about planned giving internationally, please visit The European Association for Planned Giving http://www.plannedgiving.co.uk/

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LEAVE A LEGACY

  • According to a recent report by Statistic Canada, the median donation was $250.00 nationally in 2008. Other interesting facts include:
    • Although Nunavut had the lowest rate of donors overall – 10% - their median donation was the highest, $500.00.
    • Men and women are almost equal when it comes the amount of donors, (54% are men, and 46% are women), but men tend to give a little more than women. The median donation amount for men is $280.00, while for women it is $230.00.
  • Almost 23 million Canadians or 84% of the population aged 15 and over, made a financial donation to a charitable or non-profit organization during 2007, according to a recent report. During the same period, 12.5 million Canadians, or 46% of the population, volunteered their time through a group or organization. These rates were largely unchanged from a 2004 survey. Canadians donated a total of $10 billion in 2007, up from $8.9 billion in 2004. In 2007, the average donation was $437, compared with $400 in 2004. These increases were not adjusted for inflation. The total amount of time volunteered through groups and organizations amounted to about 2.1 billion hours, which was equivalent to almost 1.1 million full-time jobs. On average, volunteers contributed 166 hours each. – Statistics Canada
  • Most Canadians (79%) feel they are familiar with charities, yet few have a high degree of familiarity with them (17% very familiar).
    • A majority of Canadians (77%) trust charities, with 27 percent trusting them a lot.
    • Trust in charities has remained about the same since 2000.
    • Amongst those with only some, little, or no trust in charities, the most commonly cited reason for not having more trust in charities is uncertainty about where the money is really going (30%).
    • Of the ten types of charities asked about in the study, Canadians are most likely to trust hospitals a lot or some (88%), followed by charities that focus on children/children’s activities (86%), health prevention/health research (85%), education (80%), social services (77%), protection of animals (73%), and protection of the environment (72%). Churches (67%), as well as churches and other places of worship (65%) are next, followed by charities that focus on the arts (63%) and international development (59%). Religious organizations are last, with 45 percent (excluding churches and other places of worship) and 44 percent (excluding churches).
    • Trust in leaders of charities is similar to the level of trust in charities, with 78 percent of Canadians saying they trust leaders of charities and 25 percent saying they trust them a lot. Only nurses (96% trust a lot/some) and medical doctors (93% trust a lot/some) are more trusted than the leaders of charities (*These findings were taken from The Muttart Foundation and Ipsos Reid Report - Talking About Charities 2008 – Final Report.)

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